I’m just curious…

I’m just curious, when did it become okay for our elected officials, the people we put in office, to come out against the will of the people and try and overturn it?  I am sick and tired of our elected officials coming out against prop 8.  If prop 8 was illegal why was it put on the ballot?  Give me a break!

There are 29 other states that have passed similar laws and amendments.  Why is California not allowed the same right?  More voters turned out in California to vote on this proposition than in any of the other states.  The people have spoken, isn’t it obvious that the majority of Californians, and Americans for that matter, do not want same-sex marriage.  No one said they did not think same-sex couples don’t have the right to be together.  No one said same-sex couples don’t have the right to equal protection under the law.  What the people are saying is we don’t want marriage redefined.  Isn’t that one of the oppositions arguments?  Aren’t they trying to say that prop 8 is redefining the constitution?  What about my right to defend the definition of marriage?  Don’t I have a right to defend the definition of something I hold dear?  I think the answer to all of these questions is YES.  There is one big difference though, when I was exercising my right to defend something I believe in, I did it peacefully.  I never protested, though I was irate that Gavin Newson thought that he had the right to single-handedly overturn the will of the people, just because he wanted  to win a few brownie points.  I never yelled and screamed, called people horrible names, or defaced other people’s property because I was livid that four judges thought that they had the right to overturn the will of the people.  What happened to my right to vote, and know that my vote counts for something?  I already know that when it comes to voting for a president, I’m usually in the minority and my vote doesn’t really count.  But when I vote for local and state issues I expect my vote to count for something.  I expect my voice to be  heard and respected.  I expect my government  and judicial system to honor my  decisions and not just throw them out if they disagree with them.  The people have spoken TWICE.  This time an even larger number of people turned out to vote to have their voices heard.  Why is our state and local government refusing to listen?

November 12, 2008. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Uncategorized. 1 comment.

Proposition 8 from a black lesbian’s perspective

I read this great article in the opinion section of the LA Times Sunday.  The article was written by Jasmyne A. Cannick.  She talks about why gay rights are not the same thing, and should not be equated to the Black Civil Rights Movement.  I agree with her whole heartedly and commend her for taking the time to write this article.

http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/commentary/la-oe-cannick8-2008nov08,0,3669070.story

The right to marry does nothing to address the problems faced by both black gays and black straights.

By Jasmyne A. Cannick

November 8, 2008

I am a perfect example of why the fight against Proposition 8, which amends the state Constitution to ban same-sex marriage, failed to win black support.

I am black. I am a political activist who cares deeply about social justice issues. I am a lesbian. This year, I canvassed the streets of South Los Angeles and Compton, knocking on doors, talking politics to passers-by and working as I never had before to ensure a large voter turnout among African Americans. But even I wasn’t inspired to encourage black people to vote against the proposition.

Why? Because I don’t see why the right to marry should be a priority for me or other black people. Gay marriage? Please. At a time when blacks are still more likely than whites to be pulled over for no reason, more likely to be unemployed than whites, more likely to live at or below the poverty line, I was too busy trying to get black people registered to vote, period; I wasn’t about to focus my attention on what couldn’t help but feel like a secondary issue.

The first problem with Proposition 8 was the issue of marriage itself. The white gay community never successfully communicated to blacks why it should matter to us above everything else — not just to me as a lesbian but to blacks generally. The way I see it, the white gay community is banging its head against the glass ceiling of a room called equality, believing that a breakthrough on marriage will bestow on it parity with heterosexuals. But the right to marry does nothing to address the problems faced by both black gays and black straights. Does someone who is homeless or suffering from HIV but has no healthcare, or newly out of prison and unemployed, really benefit from the right to marry someone of the same sex?

Maybe white gays could afford to be singularly focused, raising millions of dollars to fight for the luxury of same-sex marriage. But blacks were walking the streets of the projects and reaching out to small businesses, gang members, convicted felons and the spectrum of an entire community to ensure that we all were able to vote.

Second is the issue of civil rights. White gays often wonder aloud why blacks, of all people, won’t support their civil rights. There is a real misunderstanding by the white gay community about the term. Proponents of gay marriage fling it around as if it is a one-size-fits-all catchphrase for issues of fairness.

But the black civil rights movement was essentially born out of and driven by the black church; social justice and religion are inextricably intertwined in the black community. To many blacks, civil rights are grounded in Christianity — not something separate and apart from religion but synonymous with it. To the extent that the issue of gay marriage seemed to be pitted against the church, it was going to be a losing battle in my community.

Then there was the poorly conceived campaign strategy. Opponents of Proposition 8 relied on an outdated civil rights model, engaging the National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People to help win black support on the issue of gay marriage. This happened despite the warnings of black lesbians and gays that it wouldn’t work. While the NAACP definitely should have been included in the strategy, it shouldn’t have been the only group. Putting nearly a quarter of a million dollars into an outdated civil rights group that has very little influence on the black vote — at least when it comes to gay issues — will never work.

Likewise, holding the occasional town-hall meeting in Leimert Park — the one part of the black community where they now feel safe thanks to gentrification — to tell black people how to vote on something gay isn’t effective outreach either.

There’s nothing a white gay person can tell me when it comes to how I as a black lesbian should talk to my community about this issue. If and when I choose to, I know how to say what needs to be said. Many black gays just haven’t been convinced that this movement for marriage is about anything more than the white gays who fund it (and who, we often find, are just as racist and clueless when it comes to blacks as they claim blacks are homophobic).

Some people seem to think that homophobia trumps racism, and that winning the battle for gay marriage will symbolically bring about equality for everyone. That may seem true to white gays, but as a black lesbian, let me tell you: There are still too many inequalities that exist as it relates to my race for that to ever be the case. Ever heard of “driving while black”? Ever looked at the difference between the dropout rates for blacks and for whites? Or test scores? Or wages? Or rates of incarceration?

And in the end, black voters in California voted against gay marriage by more than 2 to 1.

Maybe next time around — because we all know this isn’t over — the gay community can demonstrate the capacity and willingness to change that America demonstrated when it went to the polls on Nov. 4. Black gays are depending on their white counterparts to finally “get it.”

Until then, don’t expect to make any inroads any time soon in the black community on this issue — including with this black lesbian.

November 10, 2008. Tags: , , , , , , . Uncategorized. Leave a comment.

Tired of the lies!

I am so tired of the “No on Prop 8”  lies and manipulations.  I tired of the media’s liberal biased view.    What happened to neutral journalism? You know when just the facts were presented as facts, without all the half truths and biased spins.  This is totally ridiculoius.

FACT: Marriage is between 1man and 1 woman.  The purpose of marriage is to create families. Traditional   marriage is protected because it benefits society.

FACT:Interracial  marriages are between 1 man and 1 woman.  The purpose of  interracial marriage is to create families. Interracial marriage is protected because it benefits society.

FACT:Same sex marriage is between 2 men or  2 women.  These unions can not create children that are genetically unique to the two people involved.

How does same sex marriage benefit society?

How can you compare interracial and same sex marriage?  You can’t, they are not the same.  The gender makeups involved in these relationships are different.

When they started allowing interracial marriages, because they were unconstitutional, paperwork and licenses did not need to be changed because the basic requirements for a marriage license did not change: one man + one woman, not related, over 18, not already married.

It’s very basic.  Please vote YES on prop.8 , restore the definition of marriage.  No one is loosing any rights.  Registered  Domestic Partners have all the same rights and privileges as married spouses under the law (California family code 297.5).

YES on Prop 8

November 3, 2008. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Uncategorized. 2 comments.

Marriage has never been a Fundamental right for ANYONE, homosexual or heterosexual

I came across this post. I don’t think I could have said it any better. Please enjoy!

One of the most prevalent arguments I have seen in recent weeks against Proposition 8 is that the amendment is wrong because it would treat people separately but equal. Those who are against Proposition 8 argue that being able to “marry who you love” is a fundamental right, and the “separate but equal” treatment violates that right.

This argument against Proposition 8 not only mischaracterizes the issue, but does so in a way that is calculated to put supporters of traditional marriage on the defensive. The right to marry has never been an unfettered right. Even today, we maintain important restrictions on the right of individuals to marry. (For example, not permitting marriage between close relatives or prohibiting someone from being married to two people at the same time).

There is nothing in the text of either the California or United States Constitution that explicitly provides that same sex marriage is a “fundamental right.” Nor is there anything in our nation’s history or traditions that establish same sex marriage as a “fundamental right.” Only three states, Massachusetts, California, and Connecticut, even allow same sex marriage and all three states only recently “discovered” this right after their Supreme Courts ruled in closely divided decisions (4-3 votes in all three states) that such a right existed.

While, as a society, we may want to add individual rights, those rights are not necessarily “fundamental rights” and, in a democracy, weighty decisions such as creating new rights should be decided by a vote of the people—not judges.

The “separate but equal” argument is also misleading because Proposition 8 does not treat people separately. If Proposition 8 passes, no one will be prevented from marrying. Individuals in California will be free to marry so long as they marry someone of the opposite gender and so long as the marriage does not violate other long-standing regulations governing marriage in California.

Those who persist in arguing for the “fundamental right” to “marry who you love” face an additional hurdle. If everyone has the right to marry who you love, why wouldn’t three women who love each other be allowed to marry? What about polygamous marriage? Shouldn’t consenting adults in these types of relationships have the right to marry?

If same sex marriage is permissible because an individual has the right to marry whomever he or she loves, the only intellectually honest reason for prohibiting these types of extreme alternative marriages is that they are not socially acceptable. But once you accept that society has a right to limit some marriage relationships , you recognize society’s right to also define marriage in a way that benefits society as a whole. That is exactly what Proposition 8 does. That is why I’m voting for it.

SOURCE: http://prop8discussion.wordpress.com/2008/10/20/separate-but-equal/

For more info, you might also be interested in this video from the What is Prop 8? website:

A Civil Right?

October 25, 2008. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Uncategorized. 5 comments.

What civil rights really mean

I found a great blog post that explains very plainly why same sex marriage is not a civil rights issue.  This post also uses facts to back it up. Kudos to you Cudweeds!

Here is an excerpt to get you interested:

……..This movement would like us to believe their agenda is a Civil Rights issue.  Many buy into this because they are uneducated about what Civil Rights really mean.

According to the Supreme Court, three things must happen to qualify a class for Civil Rights protection.

1)    History of discrimination evidenced by a lack of ability to obtain economic mean income, adequate education or cultural opportunity.  Evidence shows us this is clearly not the case. What do the facts say?

a.     Homosexuals have an average annual income of $55,430, over $20,000 more than the general populous.

b.     More than 3 times as many homosexuals as average Americans are college graduates.c.      3 times as many homosexuals as average Americans hold professional or managerial positions

2)    Protected classes should exhibit obvious, immutable or distinguishing characteristics, like race, color, gender, that define them as a discrete group.  This is obviously not the case with homosexuals.

3)    Protected classes should clearly demonstrate political powerlessness.  All we have to do is watch the news or view the current debates in the halls of Congress to find this criteria is not met either.

It is clear that none of this criterion is met!  So what then do we find to be the truth if we peer beyond this smoke screen?  The issue is really one of the attempt to legitimize and normalizing their BEHAVIOR through public law! ……..

Here’s the link:

http://cudweeds.wordpress.com/2008/03/10/lesbian-gay-day-of-silence-are-you-kidding-me/

October 19, 2008. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Uncategorized. 1 comment.

Some very good videos in support of Prop.8

These videos do an excellent job of explaining Prop.8:

I’m not Catholic but I found this video very inspiring:

Here are a couple of videos I thought were funny, but they do a great job of illistrating their point:

I just like this video:

October 18, 2008. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Uncategorized. Leave a comment.